Dish Of The Week 3/25/20: Batman/Superman 8

Each week I highlight the ultimate Comfort Food Comic release. This is the comic that gets me the most hyped. The comic I’ll remember and revisit the most. The one that gave me that special feeling above all the other releases that new comic book day.

The Dish Of The Week for 3/25/20 is Batman/Superman #8 by Joshua Williamson, Nick Derington, Dave McCaig and John J. Hill

I picked Batman/Superman 8 as the top choice this week because this comic is everything DC Comics should be. It ties up nagging plot points I hated at first and needed addressed in a delightful and satisfying way. It has spot on characterization for every character involved. It logically ties together various disparate parts of DC Continuity together in a “Why didnt I think of that way?” It continues the established development of existing characters in a great way. Its absolutely gorgeous and drawn by art God Nick Derington. And lastly, it really makes you feel things.

The main thing this book does is right some of the wrongs Brian Bendis committed in his takeover of the Superman books. The Bottle City of Kandor never needed to be destroyed. It did nothing to advance or better his story in any real meaningful way at all. This needed to be addressed and a fix needed to be found stat. Luckily, rather quickly, its addressed in this two part storyline in Batman/Superman.

The previous issue sets it up that General Zod takes it upon himself to do what he perceives Superman has done nothing about and thats resurrect all of the deceased inhabitants of Kandor. Because this is the DC Universe he finds a Lazarus Pit and Ra’s Al Ghul is dragged into the story, where he in turn drags Batman and Superman into the kerfuffle. Throughout we are given amazing comparing and contrasting between not only the obvious Ra’s and Batman and Superman and Zod, but some nice moments of Batman and Zod understanding each other’s raw pain, loss and drive in life.

Its an absolutely phenomenal issue that really gets to the core of all four of the heroes and villains in a really satisfying way for fans. Ive never been a huge fan of any of the various General Zods that have appeared in any DC Comics media. He’s always been a very annoying, brute of a villain thats never had any real empathetic development thats resonated with me before. This new version of Zod who has been around since Rebirth however has been very interesting. We’ve been able to really get a feel for his life and get a look into his mind. He has become a very interesting character. Bendis, whose Super work I’ve mostly hated, has been doing a very admirable job with his development. That development is carried into this story and further pushed with some really strong moments and a bunch of the story really being driven by him. I especially loved this issues opening and ending sequences exploring Zod as a child and Zod now as a parent carrying on the Kryptonian legacy. Zod is no longer the one note movie adapted villain who shrieks “Kneel Before Zod”, he is now a family man, a father, an almost sympathetic survivor of his people’s near extinction with a harsh code, but one you can almost understand. He is wildly interesting for the first time and its in large part to this story. I really loved it

I wont lie, this story is also so great because of the zany comic book fanservice. Its one of those great stories where when you see the solicitations, you start to hope for certain things you want to see in said story. This one delivers. You get Ra’s Al Ghul with a Kryptonite sword. You get thousands of little mini Kandorians emerging from the Lazarus Pits, crazed, attacking the characters, flying into Ra’s’ ears to hurt him. You get Ra’s sword drawn attacking Zod, saying “Kneel before Ra’s Al Ghul”. That it does all this fun little stuff is icing on the cake of a terrifically gorgeous looking, well done comic book story. Its everything you could ever ever want out of comic books and thats rare.

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